Bhat (Mewari)

Posted: April 14, 2011 in Great Commission, Missions, Unreached People groups

In Madhya Pradesh, the Bhat recall their migration from Rajasthan a long time ago. Regarding their history, Russell and Hiralal (1916) say that ‘there is no reason to doubt that the Birm or Baram Bhat are an offshoot of Brahmans, their name being nearly a corruption of the term Brahman. But the caste is a very mixed one, and another large section, the Charan are almost certainly derived from Rajputs’.

They are concentrated in Indore district. The Bhat speak the Mewari language at home, but with outsiders they speak Hindi. The Bhat, who are genealogists, have long curled moustaches and are usually dressed in a white turban, fatua and dhoti. All the Bhat except the Brahma Bhat eat fish, meat and drink liquor. Their staple cereals are jowar and rice.

An endogamous community, the Bhat have thirteen subdivisions, namely Atit, Brahma-Bhat, Devalvakia, Kankali or Bhund, Kanojiya, Kapdi, Lavania, Magan, Nagari, Palimanga or Madhavia, Sadhu, Ramnaga and Vahivancha. They also have several gotras of which the eight identified ones are Mandowar, Pithilia, Harangia, Talwareya, Sourecha, Pathonchay, Timcha and Solanki. They use gotra names as surnames. The community practises monogamy.

Women usually wear bangles (churia) and toe-rings (bkhwa) as marriage symbols. They have the custom of paying dowry (dahej). Divorce and widow remarriage are practised and a widow can remarry her deceased husband’s younger brother. They have retained their preference of living in joint families. Landed property is distributed equally among the sons after the father’s death. The Bhat observe birth pollution for eleven days. Their marriage rituals do not differ much from those of their counterparts in Haryana. The disposal of the dead is by cremation. Purificatory rites take place on the tenth day after a death; the pagri rite is held before the shradha ceremony. The Bhat’s own community council at Ujjain, die Kshatri-Bhat-Samaj, deals witJi cases of adultery, quarrels and social irregularities. Bheru is worshipped at the family level, while their community god is Ma Annapurna. It has been observed that the facilities of health care, drinking water, education, electricity, etc. have bettered their lives 

In Madhya Pradesh, the Bhat recall their migration from Rajasthan a long time ago. Regarding their history, Russell and Hiralal (1916) say that ‘there is no reason to doubt that the Birm or Baram Bhat are an offshoot of Brahmans, their name being nearly a corruption of the term Brahman. But the caste is a very mixed one, and another large section, the Charan are almost certainly derived from Rajputs’.

They are concentrated in Indore district. The Bhat speak the Mewari language at home, but with outsiders they speak Hindi. The Bhat, who are genealogists, have long curled moustaches and are usually dressed in a white turban, fatua and dhoti. All the Bhat except the Brahma Bhat eat fish, meat and drink liquor. Their staple cereals are jowar and rice.

An endogamous community, the Bhat have thirteen subdivisions, namely Atit, Brahma-Bhat, Devalvakia, Kankali or Bhund, Kanojiya, Kapdi, Lavania, Magan, Nagari, Palimanga or Madhavia, Sadhu, Ramnaga and Vahivancha. They also have several gotras of which the eight identified ones are Mandowar, Pithilia, Harangia, Talwareya, Sourecha, Pathonchay, Timcha and Solanki. They use gotra names as surnames. The community practises monogamy.

Women usually wear bangles (churia) and toe-rings (bkhwa) as marriage symbols. They have the custom of paying dowry (dahej). Divorce and widow remarriage are practised and a widow can remarry her deceased husband’s younger brother. They have retained their preference of living in joint families. Landed property is distributed equally among the sons after the father’s death.

The Bhat observe birth pollution for eleven days. Their marriage rituals do not differ much from those of their counterparts in Haryana. The disposal of the dead is by cremation. Purificatory rites take place on the tenth day after a death; the pagri rite is held before the shradha ceremony. The Bhat’s own community council at Ujjain, die Kshatri-Bhat-Samaj, deals witJi cases of adultery, quarrels and social irregularities. Bheru is worshipped at the family level, while their community god is Ma Annapurna. It has been observed that the facilities of health care, drinking water, education, electricity, etc. have bettered their lives.

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Comments
  1. This site definitely has all the information and facts I wanted concerning this subject and didn’t know who to ask.

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